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Major Themes In A Raisin In The Sun By Lorraine Hansberry

She was born to an African American family who at this time were perceived as better off than others in the African American community. He used his education and his achievements as a platform to uplift and speak out for the Black community who at this time, especially in the South, were being mistreated. Despite Hansberry’s father’s educational and academic accomplishments, he was still mistreated by society. In A Raisin in the Sun, Hansberry reflects on events that actually took place in her life, things she witnessed her father and family experience. In the play, a family gains financial stability and decides to move into a more suburban community. They receive opposition from the community when a community representative personally offers the family more money than they intend to pay for the house in exchange for not moving there.

In Act Walter even teaches his son Travis about the benefits of being rich. Mama sees money as a way to help her family succeed, Walter believes money is life, Beneatha sees money as a way to achieve her dream of becoming a doctor, and Asagai views money as a method to help others. Although money seems to be so important to the characters, by the end of the play Lorraine Hansberry shows us that money isn’t everything. A central character and matriarch of the Younger family, Mama, is not as concerned about material wealth as the other characters. She views money to be a means of achieving her dream of buying a house and helping her family move up in the world. The Youngers are a poor African-American family living on the South Side of Chicago.

Racial Discrimination In A Raisin In The Sun By Lorraine Hansberry

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Civil Rights and the 1950s TheatreCivil Rights and the 1950s Theatre Civil rights was and still is an ever changing picture. In the 1950s, civil rights went from being a generally southern issue, to being a national concern.

a raisin in the sun theme essay

George describes him as someone “wacked up with bitterness.” Mama cannot see her son consumed by failed dreams and the situation becomes alarming when Walter doesn’t take his wife’s threatened abortion seriously. The landscape of the agrarian lifestyle in Nebraska is such that Mr. Shimerda is the least suited for this type of life. He has the soul of an artist and so longs for a more refined world in which to express himself. He is a man who needs to live among people with ideas who express those concepts in conversation, which is not the world he finds in Nebraska.

Generational Disparity In Hansberry’s A Raisin In The Sun

My Big Fat Greek Wedding by Nia Vardalos is a movie about a 30 year old Greek women who falls in love with a non-greek man but he goes out of his way to please her family and change his beliefs just so he could be with her. The most common theme between all three stories is that everyone changes in a way at the end and they all have to give something up in order to grow. All the characters in the three stories had to go threw the hardships waterlily ella cara deloria chapter summary of life just to get what they wanted. Lena’s life’s dreams are not for herself, but for her family’s future generations. Big Walter’s mention in the play serves as a reminder of the sacrifices parents make for their children. She has dreams for her family to rise from poverty and live in a better and bigger place and also for them to continue to grow together as a family.

  • Achieving dreams is a major theme in this play, and here, dreams are what fuel everything, including emotions and the future.
  • Because money is such an important element in this play, the difference of opinions about it adds unnecessary conflict.
  • The Youngers struggle to attain these dreams throughout the play, and much of their happiness and depression is directly related to their attainment of, or failure to attain, these dreams.
  • There are a lot of people who just barely make it from paycheck to paycheck.

The people rebelled against all of his dealings, staged a successful coup d’etat, and he was overthrown in 1966. In retrospect, Hansberry’s prophetic accuracy is once again evident, for Nkrumah, in particular, was one of the leaders most admired by Hansberry in 1959, when Raisin opened. Other African nations also experienced political instability after their post-1959 independence.

These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry. Beneatha’s reply to Mr. Lindner’s offer to pay the family to leave Clybourne Park– a predominantly white community to live in a black community alludes to the previous mentioned scripture. When the offer was presented, Beneatha replies, “Thirty pieces and not a coin less!

Petrie’s decision to make Asagai a minor character fails to reinforce Hansberry’s central theme of the responsibility society plays in the oppression of African Americans. Walter’s character is someone who can change their attitude instantly throughout the book because of his idea of a better life. Walter isn’t a bad person it’s just his idea of a better life has made him act differently because he was given the chance to have more money.